Megan Nielsen Dash: A white denim dream come true

No, that isn’t a typo. I am aware that Megan Nielsen’s two mega popular jeans patterns are Dawn and Ash. And yes, I combined them to make my white denim dreams come true. Allow me to explain the origin of Dash.

White denim is scary. Not only due to the implied potential for catastrophe brought on by spills and leaks, but white denim jeans can be brutally unforgiving in what they reveal of the wearer. You know what I mean. All of that said, the unattainable nature of the perfect white jeans has only elevated their desirability. Wouldn’t you agree? Your favorite pairs are pinned endlessly and saved to Instagram. Only you aren’t sure if they’d look as good on you as they do on the model. And you’d really love to customize them to suit you better, but what fabric would you use? And honestly, are they practical for your lifestyle, that doubtful voice mocks you.

My inspiration photo hung out in the back of my mind for about a year when I stumbled upon a bolt of 10oz white bull denim at Jo-Ann. I knew bull denim was being widely used for non-stretch pants patterns but seeing it in person really helped me to visualize my plans. I pictured the thick, structured material hugging my dimply thighs and I was encouraged. This can hold me in, I thought. I brought it home and began to plot.

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I had in my mind a cropped flare version from Megan Nielsen to match my inspiration but I had confused the option for Ash (stretch) as one for Dawn (non-stretch). Fortunately I had both patterns on hand already and was easily able to graft on the Ash legs to my adjusted Dawn pattern, which I began a couple of inches above the knee.

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As far as adjustments go, I started with a straight size 10 and added a one inch full thigh adjustment, same as on my Ash jeans. I did not add any extra seam allowance, and in the end let out the hip and thigh area by decreasing my seam allowance to about 3/8”. The fit is tight, but good I think and while the denim is non-stretch it does give some. When they were finished I enjoyed some major 1989 flashbacks as I squatted and wriggled around to loosen up the fit. That’s the way we used to do it before all this spandex entered our world, and somehow we made the best of it, eh?

My pocket lining is a very thin cotton lawn in pale peach and I had a little fun with a bright orange YKK zipper from my stash. I think the nude-ish pocket lining was a perfect fit as I also prefer nude undergarments to white for a better blend. They don’t show through at all from what I can tell. The hardware is from Threadbare Fabrics in the color brass. I went with a raw hem a-la inspriation photo and at the last minute did narrow that flare for a more subtle look.

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I can’t not mention the top I’m wearing here: the Grainline Hadley in Dotted Rayon Cotton Voile from Blackbird Fabrics. I’ve had this pattern forever but kept lagging in making it. I knew I needed to raise that V neck and it turned out to be super easy. I make a size 6 which is what I usually go for with Grainline, but it felt really tight around the armscye so I scooped into it a bit to give me some extra room. I also hacked off about 3 inches from the length and I find it to be the perfect crop for short-waisted me. I’m not 100% sold on this silhouette for me, but a long necklace does weigh down the front a bit to keep it from looking maternity, and I do think it pairs super cute with my jeans. I took a few shots to explain raising the neckline, with some bare-bones instructions. You’re smart, you’ll get it ;)

1. Cut out the center front section

1. Cut out the center front section

2. Slide up the cut section the desired number of inches

2. Slide up the cut section the desired number of inches

3. Tape in place and add extra paper to fill in the gap.

3. Tape in place and add extra paper to fill in the gap.

4. Use a dressmakers curve to smooth out the new line.

4. Use a dressmakers curve to smooth out the new line.

Wannabe Fashion Jackson

Wannabe Fashion Jackson

I’m pretty happy with the result, and clean or dirty I’ll wear them with pride.

xo April